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By Obaidullah Junaid Blog Published on - 30 May - 2023

When to Visit a Doctor for Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are hard deposits made of minerals and salts that form inside the kidneys. They can cause severe pain and discomfort, and if left untreated, they can lead to serious complications. In this blog, we will discuss when to see a doctor for kidney stones, the diagnosis process, and treatment options.

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When to See a Doctor for Kidney Stones

If you experience any of the following symptoms, it is important to see a doctor as soon as possible:

  • Severe Pain in the Back, Side, or Groin: The most common symptom of kidney stones is severe pain in the back, side, or groin. The pain can come and go, and it may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and fever. If the pain is unbearable and does not subside with over-the-counter pain medication, it is important to seek medical attention.
  • Blood in Urine: If you notice blood in your urine, it may be a sign of a kidney stone. This can happen when the stone irritates the lining of the urinary tract, causing bleeding. Blood in the urine can also be a sign of a urinary tract infection, so it is important to see a doctor to determine the cause.
  • Difficulty Urinating: If you experience pain or difficulty urinating, it may be a sign of a kidney stone blocking the flow of urine. This can lead to a urinary tract infection and other complications, so it is important to see a doctor right away.

Diagnosis of Kidney Stones

To diagnose kidney stones, your doctor may order several tests, including:

  • Urine Tests: Your doctor may order a urine test to check for signs of infection or blood in the urine.
  • Blood Tests: Blood tests can help determine if you have an infection or if there are any abnormalities in your kidney function.
  • Imaging Tests: Imaging tests such as X-rays, ultrasounds, and CT scans can help identify the location and size of the kidney stones.

Treatment Options for Kidney Stones

The treatment for kidney stones depends on the size and location of the stone, as well as your overall health. Treatment options include:

  • Medications: Your doctor may prescribe medication to help manage the pain and discomfort associated with kidney stones. They may also prescribe medications to help the stone pass more easily.
  • Drinking Plenty of Fluids: Drinking plenty of fluids can help flush out the stone and prevent future stones from forming.
  • Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL): ESWL is a non-invasive procedure that uses shock waves to break up the kidney stone into smaller pieces, making it easier to pass.
  • Ureteroscopy: Ureteroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that involves inserting a thin, flexible tube with a camera into the urethra and up into the bladder and ureter to remove the stone.
  • Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL): PCNL is a minimally invasive procedure that involves making a small incision in the back to remove the kidney stone.

Preventing Kidney Stones

To prevent kidney stones from forming in the future, you can:

  1. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water.
  2. Limit your intake of sodium and animal protein.
  3. Eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
  4. Limit your intake of oxalate-rich foods, such as spinach and rhubarb.
  5. Talk to your doctor about medications that can help prevent kidney stones.

In conclusion, kidney stones can cause severe pain and discomfort, and if left untreated, they can lead to serious complications. If you experience symptoms such as severe pain, blood in the urine, or difficulty urinating, it is important to see a doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor can diagnose the kidney stone using various tests and recommend appropriate treatment options. These may include medication, drinking plenty of fluids, non-invasive procedures like ESWL, or minimally invasive procedures like ureteroscopy or PCNL.

Overall, kidney stones can be a painful and uncomfortable condition, but with prompt medical attention and proper treatment, they can be managed effectively. If you suspect you may have kidney stones or experience any of the symptoms mentioned above, do not hesitate to seek medical attention. A doctor can help you diagnose the condition and develop an appropriate treatment plan, allowing you to get back to living a healthy, pain-free life. It's important to note that some people may be more prone to developing kidney stones than others. Certain medical conditions, such as hyperparathyroidism, gout, and inflammatory bowel disease, can increase the risk of kidney stone formation. If you have a history of kidney stones or any of these conditions, it's especially important to take steps to prevent future stones.

It's also important to note that kidney stones can sometimes be a sign of an underlying medical condition, such as a kidney or bladder infection, or a metabolic disorder. If you experience recurrent kidney stones or have a family history of the condition, it's important to discuss this with your doctor. They may recommend additional tests to check for any underlying conditions or genetic factors that may be contributing to your kidney stone formation.


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Kidney stones are formed when certain substances in the urine, such as calcium, oxalate, and uric acid, crystallize and stick together to form a stone. Certain medical conditions, such as hyperparathyroidism, gout, and inflammatory bowel disease, can also increase the risk of kidney stone formation.
The most common symptoms of kidney stones include severe pain in the back, side, or groin, nausea and vomiting, blood in the urine, and difficulty urinating. Some people may also experience fever and chills.
A doctor can diagnose kidney stones using a variety of tests, including imaging tests like CT scans and ultrasounds, blood tests, and urine tests. These tests can help determine the size and location of the stone, as well as any underlying medical conditions that may be contributing to its formation.
Treatment for kidney stones depends on the size and location of the stone, as well as the severity of symptoms. In some cases, medication and increased fluid intake may be enough to pass the stone. In more severe cases, non-invasive procedures like extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) or minimally invasive procedures like ureteroscopy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) may be necessary.
To prevent kidney stones, it's important to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids, limit your intake of sodium, animal protein, and oxalate-rich foods, and maintain a healthy diet and weight. Some people may also benefit from increasing their intake of magnesium, citrate, and potassium. It's important to talk to your doctor before making any major changes to your diet or taking any supplements, as they may interact with other medications or medical conditions.
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