Blog Image

Everything You Need to Know About MRIs

13 Sep, 2023

Blog author iconHealthtrip
Share

A full body MRI is a non-invasive imaging test that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the inside of the body. It can be used to detect a wide range of medical conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

1. How does a full body MRI work?

During a full body MRI, you will lie on a table that slides into a long, narrow tube. The tube is surrounded by a large magnet. The magnet creates a strong magnetic field that aligns the atoms in your body. Radio waves are then emitted and absorbed by the aligned atoms. The radio waves are then detected by the MRI machine and converted into images.

2. What can a full body MRI detect?

A full body MRI can detect a wide range of medical conditions, including:

  • Cancer: MRIs can be used to detect cancer in its early stages, when it is most treatable. They can also be used to track the progression of cancer and to see how well treatment is working.
  • Heart disease: MRIs can be used to assess the health of the heart and blood vessels. They can be used to detect heart defects, heart attacks, and strokes.
  • Stroke: MRIs can be used to diagnose stroke and to assess the damage caused by the stroke. They can also be used to monitor the recovery process.
  • Brain tumors: MRIs can be used to detect brain tumors and to assess their size and location. They can also be used to guide surgery and radiation therapy.
  • Spinal cord injuries: MRIs can be used to assess the extent of a spinal cord injury and to plan treatment.
  • Bone and joint disorders: MRIs can be used to diagnose bone and joint disorders, such as arthritis, torn ligaments, and herniated discs.

3. Is a full body MRI safe?

Full body MRIs are generally safe for most people. However, there are some risks associated with the procedure, including:

  • Claustrophobia: Some people may feel claustrophobic in the MRI tube.
  • Metal objects: If you have any metal objects in your body, such as a pacemaker or an insulin pump, you will not be able to have an MRI.
  • Allergic reaction: Some people may have an allergic reaction to the contrast dye used in some MRI scans.

4. Who should have a full body MRI?

Full body MRIs are not usually recommended for people who do not have any symptoms or risk factors for disease.

MRIs can be used to diagnose a wide range of medical conditions, so many people may need an MRI at some point in their lives. Here are some of the most common reasons why people need an MRI:

  • Cancer: MRIs can be used to detect cancer in its early stages, when it is most treatable. They can also be used to track the progression of cancer and to see how well treatment is working.
  • Heart disease: MRIs can be used to assess the health of the heart and blood vessels. They can be used to detect heart defects, heart attacks, and strokes.
  • Stroke: MRIs can be used to diagnose stroke and to assess the damage caused by the stroke. They can also be used to monitor the recovery process.
  • Brain tumors: MRIs can be used to detect brain tumors and to assess their size and location. They can also be used to guide surgery and radiation therapy.
  • Spinal cord injuries: MRIs can be used to assess the extent of a spinal cord injury and to plan treatment.
  • Bone and joint disorders: MRIs can be used to diagnose bone and joint disorders, such as arthritis, torn ligaments, and herniated discs.
  • Inflammatory diseases: MRIs can be used to diagnose inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Kidney disease: MRIs can be used to assess the health of the kidneys and to detect kidney stones.
  • Pregnancy: MRIs can be used to assess the health of the fetus and to diagnose certain birth defects.

In addition to these common reasons, MRIs may also be used for other purposes, such as:

  • To guide biopsies or other medical procedures.
  • To assess the response to treatment.
  • To plan surgery.
  • To monitor the progression of a disease


    5. Things to expect before, during, and after an MRI procedure:

    Before the procedure:
    • You will need to remove all metal objects from your body, including jewelry, watches, and hearing aids.
    • You may also be asked to wear a hospital gown.
    • If you are claustrophobic, you may be given medication to help you relax.
    • If you are allergic to iodine, you will need to tell your doctor. You may be given a different type of contrast dye.
    During the procedure:
    • You will lie on a table that slides into a long, narrow tube. The tube is surrounded by a large magnet.
    • The MRI machine will make loud noises, so you may be given earplugs or headphones to wear.
    • You will need to lie still during the scan. This may be difficult, but it is important to stay as still as possible to get clear images.
    • The scan will take about an hour.
    After the procedure:
    • You can usually go home immediately after the MRI.
    • If you were given contrast dye, you may need to wait for a few hours before driving.
    • You may feel a little tired or groggy after the MRI. This is normal and should go away on its own.

    6.Benefits of full body MRIs:

    • They can detect cancer in its early stages, when it is most treatable.
    • They can provide detailed images of the inside of the body, which can help doctors diagnose and plan treatment for a variety of medical conditions.
    • They are non-invasive and do not use radiation, which makes them a safe option for people of all ages.

    7.Risks of full body MRIs:

    • Claustrophobia: Some people may feel claustrophobic in the MRI tube.
    • Metal objects: If you have any metal objects in your body, such as a pacemaker or an insulin pump, you will not be able to have an MRI.
    • Allergic reaction: Some people may have an allergic reaction to the contrast dye used in some MRI scans.
    • Noise: The MRI machine is very loud, which can be uncomfortable for some people.


      8.The Future of Full Body MRI

      As technology continues to advance; the potential applications of Full Body MRI tests are bound to expand further. With improved image resolution, reduced scan times, and increased accessibility, Full Body MRI tests have the potential to become a routine part of healthcare check-ups.
      Furthermore, the integration of artificial intelligence and machine learning into the interpretation of Full Body MRI images promises to enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. These tools can help identify subtle abnormalities that might be missed by the human eye, leading to more precise diagnoses.

Transform Your Beauty, Boost Your Confidence

Find the right cosmetic procedure for your needs.

Healthtrip icon

We specialize in a wide range of cosmetic procedures

Procedure

Calculate Treatment Cost, Check Symptoms, Explore Doctors and Hospitals

Most popular procedures in

Total Hip Replacemen

Upto 80% off

90% Rated

Satisfactory

Total Hip Replacement (Unilateral)

Total Hip Replacemen

Upto 80% off

90% Rated

Satisfactory

Total Hip Replacement (B/L)

Breast Cancer Surger

Upto 80% off

90% Rated

Satisfactory

Breast Cancer Surgery

Total Knee Replaceme

Upto 80% off

90% Rated

Satisfactory

Total Knee Replacement-B/L

Total Knee Replaceme

Upto 80% off

90% Rated

Satisfactory

Total Knee Replacement-U/L
Healthtrip icon

Wellness Treatment

Give yourself the time to relax

certified

Lowest Prices Guaranteed!

Treatments for Weight loss, Detox, Destress, Traditional Treatments, 3 day healthtrip and more

95% Rated Great Experience and Relaxing

Get in touch
Please fill in your details, Our experts will get in touch with you

FAQs

An MRI is a non-invasive imaging test that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the inside of the body.